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Epson and Panasonic join forces in 16:9 format to digital photography

Epson and Panasonic are joining forces to expand the 16:9 format to digital photography. The 16:9 format is the new HDTV standard, which is gradually replacing the tradional 4:3 television and monitor standard and 3:2 photo format in a range of devices. Panasonic has introduced its Lumix LX2 digital camera to feature a 16:9 CCD sensor and LCD screen. Epson is launching Premium Glossy Photo Paper 16:9, compatible with a range of Epson printers including the new Epson PictureMate PM 240 and PictureMate PM 280...

PRESS SUMMARY

Epson and Panasonic join forces in 16:9 format to digital photography - digital camera and photography newsAs 16:9 ratio has become the international standard of HDTV, a new photo culture is emerging, raising the demand for true 16:9 format cameras, printers and photo paper. At the forefront are Epson and Panasonic with new products to meet the needs of photographers who want to shoot, view and print in 16:9 format which brings wider breadth and deeper perspective into the picture. Panasonic has introduced its LUMIX LX2 digital camera to feature a 16:9 CCD sensor and LCD screen. Epson is launching Premium Glossy Photo Paper 16:9 (101.60mm x 180.60mm). It features a smooth, bright white resin-coated layer for a vibrant high-gloss finish and is compatible with a range of Epson printers including the new Epson PictureMate PM 240 and PictureMate PM 280.

As an introductory offer Epson and Panasonic are joining together to provide a trial sample of the new 16:9 Premium Glossy Photo Paper with every purchase of the Panasonic DMC-LX2.

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX2, 10.2-megaixel advanced compact camera, is unique in that it incorporates triple-wide features of 28 mm wide angle Leica DC lens, 16:9 wide CCD and 16:9 wide LCD. The DMC-LX2 also features MEGA O.I.S. (Optical Image stabilizer) and Intelligent ISO control to compensate for any kind of blur caused by hand shake and subject movement. Not only the DMC-LX2 but all other LUMIX cameras can record 16:9 aspect photos to support this new photographic experience

The Epson PictureMate PM 280 and PictureMate PM 240 are premium quality 10x15cm photo printers, incorporating Epson's latest printing technologies, PhotoEnhance and Advanced Variable-Sized Droplet technology. Both work in standalone mode, so you don't even need to connect to your computer. To print your 16:9 ratio photo, simply insert your digital camera memory card into the printer, select the 16:9 Epson Premium Glossy Photo Paper option and print. Exclusive to the PictureMate PM 280, is an internal CD drive allowing you to print directly from a CD or save images from your digital memory card to CD. Both printers also provide direct printing from digital camera memory cards, USB DIRECT-PRINT™, PictBridge and an optional Bluetooth® adapter.

Esther Smirnovs, Product Manager, Panasonic Marketing Europe says, "Panasonic has established a new photo culture for the digital age with our LUMIX range. The 16:9 ratio is close to our natural way of seeing things, and is more in proportion with the way we view scenes. It is no surprise that customers are increasingly demanding it in the home. Panasonic is meeting their needs through our wide range of products including High Definition plasma TVs, DVD recorders and digital cameras. We believe the 16:9 photography is a key function for digital imaging and Epson's new printers and 16:9 papers are also playing an important part.”

Yasbir Sihan, Senior Product Manager, Epson Europe says, “Epson recognises that 16:9 format is increasingly being required in digital photography. Where Panasonic has provided the technology to ensure it is possible to shoot images in true 16:9, Epson has used its expertise to provide a premium quality photo paper and printer range. The result is that digital photographers can produce perfect 16:9 format photos without losing any part of the image or sacrificing quality”.
September 22, 2006
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