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New Sony Li-ion batteries offer extended life span

Sony has launched a new lithium ion secondary battery, using olivine-type lithium iron phosphate as the cathode, thereby achieving a power density of 1800W/kg and a life span of 2,000 charge cycles. The new battery can be charged to 99% of its capacity in 30 minutes, and will initially be supplied for motor driven devices such as power tools. By comparison, the Toshiba SCiB battery, introduced in March 2008 and mainly used in electric vehicles, has a life span of 3000 cycles and can be recharged to 90% capacity in five minutes...

PRESS SUMMARY

All you ever wanted to know about batteries at BatteryUniversity.comSony Launches High-power, Long-life Lithium Ion Secondary Battery Using Olivine-type Lithium Iron Phosphate as the Cathode Material

Sony Corporation today announced that it has launched a new type of lithium ion secondary battery that combines high-power and long-life performance, using olivine-type lithium iron phosphate as the cathode material. Shipment commenced in June 2009.

The Olivine-type lithium iron phosphate used in this new battery is extremely suited for use as a cathode material due to its robust crystal structure and stable performance, even at high temperatures. By combining this new cathode material with Sony's proprietary particle design technology that minimizes electrical resistance to deliver high power output, and also leveraging the cell structure design technology Sony accrued developing its current "Fortelion series" lithium ion secondary battery line-up, Sony has realized a high power density of 1800W/kg and extended life span of approximately 2,000 charge-discharge cycles.

Furthermore, with this new battery able to charge rapidly, in addition to providing a stable discharge of voltage, it will first be supplied for use in motor driven devices such as power tools, after which its application will be expanded to a wide range of other mobile electronic devices. With lithium ion secondary batteries able to deliver both compact size and high capacity, their usage continues to diversify and grow. By adding this high-power, long-life lithium ion secondary battery to its lineup, Sony will aim to continue to provide batteries optimized to its customers' requirements, and further strengthen its lithium ion secondary battery business going forward.

Main Features

1. Power density: 1800W/kg (20A continuous discharge)
2. Long-life: more than 80% capacity retention after 2,000 charge-discharge cycles  
3. Rapid charging: 99% charge completed in 30 minutes

Details of Main Features

1. Power density: 1800W/kg (20A continuous discharge)
Sony has leveraged its proprietary particle design technology that realizes high power by minimizing electrical resistance, together with the cell structure design technology it accrued developing its current lithium ion secondary battery line-up to successfully achieve high-power density of 1800W/kg. This enables the new battery to discharge large currents, while also providing a stable output of voltage, making it highly suitable for use in motor driven applications such as power tools.
   
2. Long-life; more than 80% capacity retention after 2,000 charge-discharge cycles)
This new battery delivers an extended life-span of over four-times existing secondary lithium ion batteries used in conventional electronic devices (G-series, A-series) due to the olivine-type lithium iron phosphate's robust crystal structure, and Sony's proprietary particle design technology. Its enhanced durability makes this new battery ideal for use in a wide range of mobile electronic devices.
   
3. Rapid charging; 99% charge is completed in 30 minutes
This new battery can be charged to 99% of its full capacity in 30 minutes, which represents approximately half the charge time of Sony's current lithium ion battery line-up (G-series, A-series), which mainly use cobalt oxide based cathodes.

Additional information: All you ever wanted to know about batteries at BatteryUniversity.com
August 11, 2009
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