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PCWorld selects the 50 best Tech Products of All Time

The folks over at PCWorld have selected - considering hundreds of products and engaging in many hours of painstaking debate - the 50 best tech products. Three nominees are digital cameras. The Sony Mavica MVC-FD5 boosted the popularity of the digital photograhy back in 1997. The stainless steel and impossibly small Canon Digital Elph S100 proved in 2000 how sophisticated a pocket camera could look. In 2003 it was the Canon EOS Digital Rebel - a 6.3-megapixel digital SLR - that broke the $1000 price point...

SUMMARY

Read the complete article on the 50 Best Tech Products of All Time
17. Canon Digital Elph S100 (2000)

Early digital cameras weren't much to look at: They were large, clunky, and utterly lacking in aesthetics. But the original Digital Elph changed all that. Clad in stainless steel and almost impossibly small, Canon's S100 showed how sophisticated a pocket camera could look. Yet it didn't compromise on features, offering a 2.1-megapixel CCD, a 2x optical zoom lens, and auto focus.

Today, digicams continue to take design cues from the Elph; Canon's pocket cameras and its current Elph model, the PowerShot SD630, still maintain the overall look of the original model.



48. Sony Mavica MVC-FD5 (1997)

In the wee early days of digital photography, getting pictures from camera to computer was a major challenge.

There were no memory card slots, no Bluetooth, not even USB. Sony's Mavica MVC-FD5 was a stroke of genius: Put a floppy drive inside the camera, and then let shutterbugs use sneakernet to tote photos back and forth.

You could fit about eight pictures on a disk (images were limited to 640-by-480-pixel resolution), which was good enough for most people at the time. The Mavica line eventually evolved to include integrated DVD writers.



44. Canon EOS Digital Rebel (2003)

With the 2003 launch of the Digital Rebel, Canon brought high-end camera technology to regular consumers. The EOS was a 6.3-megapixel digital SLR that broke the $1000 price point, finally putting swappable lenses and greater photographic control within financial reach of serious shutterbugs disappointed with the performance of pocket digicams.

The Rebel may also be the most-hacked camera ever made: Clever tweakers have created new firmware for the camera and even written DOS apps for it. The Rebel line is still a mainstay for Canon, with its EOS Digital Rebel Xti a popular choice for serious photographers.

Additional information: Read the complete article on the 50 Best Tech Products of All Time
April 4, 2007
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